The Importance of Offering Fertility Benefits in Your Healthcare Package

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If there’s one overriding lesson to be learned from the pandemic and the Great Resignation, it’s that employees will both stay and go on health care benefits.

For employers to recruit and retain top talent, they need to see health care benefits as a number one player in the employment game. Research has shown that health coverage is important, especially for a younger population, with 85% of millennials claiming health care coverage is an essential part of their job.

Employers then wonder how they can improve their benefits to attract and retain their most valuable resource: human capital. One answer is clear: to provide a comprehensive health care package that takes into account the growing demand for family building services, such as diagnosis, treatment and fertility preservation. Main employers like Bank of America, Pinterest, Spotify, Google and many others are including these services in their healthcare plans, and it’s time for more companies – big and small – to follow suit.

As the founder and CEO of a fertility service provider and as a business owner who provides my own employees with family building benefits, including fertility care and adoption benefits, I think it’s important for all leaders to look at employee recruitment and retention through this lens and consider whether adding fertility care might impact their workforce.

Coverage for all medical conditions

The birth rate in the United States is steadily falling, reaching a all-time low in 2020and one of the culprits is the lack of financial accessibility to fertility care.

Infertility is not elective, but rather a condition that affects one in eight American couples. Employers must recognize that when they offer insurance coverage to their employees, they are offering to cover all of their medical conditions, including infertility. By incorporating fertility care into employee benefits and health insurance plans on a regular basis, more people can access these medical services and understand exactly which treatment options are best for them.

Fertility Care Can Amplify Your DEI Efforts

Unfortunately, infertility continues to be thought of as just a female health issue, when in fact, up to 40% of infertility cases are linked to male infertility. Additionally, by focusing only on women, we are wiping out a large subset of the population that needs fertility services to build families, including those in the LGBTQ+ community or aspiring single parents.

By making fertility care accessible to everyone in an organization, you send a clear message that you support diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) efforts and value all families from all walks of life.

The cost to employers is negligible

The high costs of fertility treatments can deter companies from offering fertility care as part of a comprehensive healthcare package. But adding fertility benefits to existing health plans would result in a maximum increase in premiums. a little more than 1%, essentially making fertility costs negligible for employers. And the ultimate benefit for employers is higher retention and recruitment.

How to start

Here’s how you can incorporate fertility care into your benefits package.

  1. Call your current employee insurance provider and find out what fertility care options and supplements they offer.
  2. If your current provider does not offer complementary fertility care services, you can work with an outside provider who only offers fertility care benefits. This additional insurance coverage can help fill any gaps.
  3. If none of these options match your current setup, you can also offer employees a health allowance, a fixed amount that employees can use for the medical care they need. This allowance is included in their salary, making it additional taxable income.

Offering fertility care as part of a benefits package is an important and essential way to show your company values ​​and demonstrate to employees that they work in a family-oriented, employee-centered environment.

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